Tag Archives: Flickr

Is Flickr Guilty of ‘Freemium Extortion’?

Clock
The clock is ticking for non-subscribing users of Flickr…

If you hit the Flickr Help Forum, you’ll currently find a thread of well over 8,000 posts relating to what some are describing as a blackmail scheme. Many of the comments do defend Flickr, although the defensive comments mainly come from a handful of supporters who post intensively. Whether that passes as credible support is open to debate, but there’s no doubt that a drastic policy change, announced by Flickr at the beginning of last November, has upset a lot of people. Have we really witnessed an extortion plot?…

WHAT HAPPENED AT FLICKR?

In May 2013, the then Flickr owners Yahoo scrapped a 300MB per month image upload limit for users with free accounts, and set an astronomical new maximum upload capacity of 1TB. Users with free accounts were told, at this point, that the new storage capacity was free to the photographer, and funded by the advertiser. No buts, no untils; that’s what they were told.

In spring 2018, SmugMug bought Flickr, expressing an intention to continue running the platform without significant change.

In November 2018, SmugMug U-turned on their previous assertion, warning that from January 2019, free Flickr accounts would have their maximum capacity limited to 1,000 photos in total, and threatening to delete all excess images after 5th February 2019.

In summary, users with free Flickr accounts were encouraged to upload a vast quantity of images on the basis that they would not have to pay, and then, after many had made major commitments to Flickr, they were told their work would be deleted if they did not pay. There isn’t even a way to put a positive spin on it. Continue reading Is Flickr Guilty of ‘Freemium Extortion’?

Will SmugMug Keep Flickr Free To Use?

Class 150 Diesel Train - Birmingham, 2000

It’s a testament to Yahoo!/Oath’s running of Flickr in recent times, that it took an official email notification of SmugMug’s new acquisition to remind me that Flickr still existed. For reasons I outlined in the recent Oath/Tumblr post, businesses such as Oath do not inspire great confidence in creative people. But unlike Oath, SmugMug is not a portal-wielding bait-baron obsessed with trite, populist news and cheesily-executed ad campaigns. It’s a photo-sharing business. So, has Flickr been saved? Continue reading Will SmugMug Keep Flickr Free To Use?

The History of Online Photo Sharing: Part 2

ImageShack 2015

If you missed Part 1 of this history, you can find it via the following link…

The History of Online Photo Sharing: Part 1

If you’ve already read Part 1, let’s step forward into the mid noughties…

2004

It was in the wake of Photobucket’s arrival that ventures such as ImageShack and ImageVenue followed – also offering free hotlinking to big sharing platforms (i.e. the forums). Indeed, 2004 brought a wave of these new, free, image publishing hosts into being. ImageShack became a huge player, but it was Flickr, born in mid February 2004, that really took things to the next level… Continue reading The History of Online Photo Sharing: Part 2

Flickr Fudging Views From Twitter?

Flickr image

Big UGC (User Generated Content) websites know a lot about users’ behaviour. But one of the things they’re most acutely aware of is that users are not going to post content if they feel no one’s interested. Each site has its own way of trying to reassure users that what they post is being viewed by other interested parties, thus maintaining a desire in contributors to keep feeding the mighty content machine. But over time, some sites’ methods have become increasingly dubious. In particular, there’s been a tendency on the part of various UGC facilities to exaggerate the amount of interest in users’ work in order to keep them motivated. Continue reading Flickr Fudging Views From Twitter?

How to Stop Content Theft on Flickr

Alien at Birmingham Bull Ring Opening

[UPDATE: Please note that this post is no longer valid. Due to Flickr’s Favorites leak, which serves favorited images to scrapers and search engines regardless of your settings, there’s now nothing you can do to stop your images falling prey to scrapers, with Flickr’s blessing.]

A scraper is an Internet thief who uses automated routines to steal unthinkable quantities of creative work, and the huge photo site Flickr is a scraper’s paradise. Not only does Flickr virtually guarantee scrapers usable, categorised and vetted content – it even gives them an official API tool which makes it childishly simple for them to gather it up and re-post it. Continue reading How to Stop Content Theft on Flickr