Tag Archives: photography

Is Flickr Guilty of ‘Freemium Extortion’?

Clock
The clock is ticking for non-subscribing users of Flickr…

If you hit the Flickr Help Forum, you’ll currently find a thread of well over 8,000 posts relating to what some are describing as a blackmail scheme. Many of the comments do defend Flickr, although the defensive comments mainly come from a handful of supporters who post intensively. Whether that passes as credible support is open to debate, but there’s no doubt that a drastic policy change, announced by Flickr at the beginning of last November, has upset a lot of people. Have we really witnessed an extortion plot?…

WHAT HAPPENED AT FLICKR?

In May 2013, the then Flickr owners Yahoo scrapped a 300MB per month image upload limit for users with free accounts, and set an astronomical new maximum upload capacity of 1TB. Users with free accounts were told, at this point, that the new storage capacity was free to the photographer, and funded by the advertiser. No buts, no untils; that’s what they were told.

In spring 2018, SmugMug bought Flickr, expressing an intention to continue running the platform without significant change.

In November 2018, SmugMug U-turned on their previous assertion, warning that from January 2019, free Flickr accounts would have their maximum capacity limited to 1,000 photos in total, and threatening to delete all excess images after 5th February 2019.

In summary, users with free Flickr accounts were encouraged to upload a vast quantity of images on the basis that they would not have to pay, and then, after many had made major commitments to Flickr, they were told their work would be deleted if they did not pay. There isn’t even a way to put a positive spin on it. Continue reading Is Flickr Guilty of ‘Freemium Extortion’?

How Much Does Social Media Need Mr and Mrs Angry?

UK TV Listings 1971
Central England’s programme listings for Wednesday 1st September 1971, in a vintage TV Times magazine. Image by @JPEGJuice.

Once upon a time, there was no internet, and for Mr Way-Too-Much-Time-On-His-Hands, finding a virtual release valve was nothing like as simple as it is today.

He couldn’t just go onto Twitter and disagree with news bots, or call football managers cretins until he got his enraged little ass suspended.

Nope. If Mr Way-Too-Much-Time-On-His-Hands wanted a reason to get his knickers in a twist in ye olde distant past, chances were that it would reach him via a newspaper, a magazine, or a television. But he’d still want to say his piece. So whilst interactivity was a very slow process in the mid twentieth century, print publications pulled out all the stops to expedite angry readers’ letters onto their sensation-hungry pages. Continue reading How Much Does Social Media Need Mr and Mrs Angry?

Will SmugMug Keep Flickr Free To Use?

Class 150 Diesel Train - Birmingham, 2000

It’s a testament to Yahoo!/Oath’s running of Flickr in recent times, that it took an official email notification of SmugMug’s new acquisition to remind me that Flickr still existed. For reasons I outlined in the recent Oath/Tumblr post, businesses such as Oath do not inspire great confidence in creative people. But unlike Oath, SmugMug is not a portal-wielding bait-baron obsessed with trite, populist news and cheesily-executed ad campaigns. It’s a photo-sharing business. So, has Flickr been saved? Continue reading Will SmugMug Keep Flickr Free To Use?

How to Like Holy Lord God on the Internet

Jesus H Christ
Messiah

Dad, would you be interested in having a Like button?

God
Almighty Ruler

What would be the point of that?

Jesus H Christ
Messiah

So people can like you.

God
Almighty Ruler

People already do like me… They send me prayers.

Jesus H Christ
Messiah

Only when they want something. And someone… I can’t say who… But someone says we’ve moved on, and praying takes too long for people in the modern world, and that’s why they only do it when they’re massively overdrawn… I mean, it’s not that fewer people want to like you; it’s just that they haven’t got time… But if we could just make a sort of ‘Like God‘ button that people could press on their phones, they’d like you a lot more… Well, that’s what this person says anyway… But I can’t tell you who said it…

Continue reading How to Like Holy Lord God on the Internet

Lecture: How To Find a Lost Train

Birmingham Railway Museum

by Jack Smart…
Private Investigator
As you probably know, I am presenting a lecture tomorrow evening on the subject of how to find a lost train. At the behest of the Administrator of this blog, who is one of the organisers of the event, I have also agreed to take questions from a sole trader who has lost a shop.

Continue reading Lecture: How To Find a Lost Train

The History of Online Photo Sharing: Part 2

ImageShack 2015

If you missed Part 1 of this history, you can find it via the following link…

The History of Online Photo Sharing: Part 1

If you’ve already read Part 1, let’s step forward into the mid noughties…

2004

It was in the wake of Photobucket’s arrival that ventures such as ImageShack and ImageVenue followed – also offering free hotlinking to big sharing platforms (i.e. the forums). Indeed, 2004 brought a wave of these new, free, image publishing hosts into being. ImageShack became a huge player, but it was Flickr, born in mid February 2004, that really took things to the next level… Continue reading The History of Online Photo Sharing: Part 2

The History of Online Photo Sharing: Part 1

Fuji Finepix 6800 and Pixology advert

As we head into the final quarter of 2015, free photo sharing on the Internet is staggeringly ubiquitous, and is something most of us take for granted. Today, most online image sharing is really publishing – making images available (or at least potentially available) to a wide audience, most of whom may not be known to the image creator.

But whilst this phenomenon is now deeply entrenched in Web culture, it’s still relatively new. It’s easy to forget that the technology to even capture digital images did not gain great presence in the mainstream until long after the Internet became a recognised resource. It’s also easy to forget that until June 2011, photos could not be uploaded directly to tweets (I know, imagine not having a photo-upload button on a tweet composition box!). And for some of us, it’s getting harder by the week to remember the roots of online photo sharing. When did all this start, and how did it take over our lives? Continue reading The History of Online Photo Sharing: Part 1