Lecture: How To Find a Lost Train

Birmingham Railway Museum

by Jack Smart…
Private Investigator
As you probably know, I am presenting a lecture tomorrow evening on the subject of how to find a lost train. At the behest of the Administrator of this blog, who is one of the organisers of the event, I have also agreed to take questions from a sole trader who has lost a shop.

Continue reading Lecture: How To Find a Lost Train

The History of Online Photo Sharing: Part 2

ImageShack 2015

If you missed Part 1 of this history, you can find it via the following link…

The History of Online Photo Sharing: Part 1

If you’ve already read Part 1, let’s step forward into the mid noughties…

2004

It was in the wake of Photobucket’s arrival that ventures such as ImageShack and ImageVenue followed – also offering free hotlinking to big sharing platforms (i.e. the forums). Indeed, 2004 brought a wave of these new, free, image publishing hosts into being. ImageShack became a huge player, but it was Flickr, born in mid February 2004, that really took things to the next level… Continue reading The History of Online Photo Sharing: Part 2

The History of Online Photo Sharing: Part 1

Fuji Finepix 6800 and Pixology advert

As we head into the final quarter of 2015, free photo sharing on the Internet is staggeringly ubiquitous, and is something most of us take for granted. Today, most online image sharing is really publishing – making images available (or at least potentially available) to a wide audience, most of whom may not be known to the image creator.

But whilst this phenomenon is now deeply entrenched in Web culture, it’s still relatively new. It’s easy to forget that the technology to even capture digital images did not gain great presence in the mainstream until long after the Internet became a recognised resource. It’s also easy to forget that until June 2011, photos could not be uploaded directly to tweets (I know, imagine not having a photo-upload button on a tweet composition box!). And for some of us, it’s getting harder by the week to remember the roots of online photo sharing. When did all this start, and how did it take over our lives? Continue reading The History of Online Photo Sharing: Part 1

How To Correct Unsharp Images on WordPress.com

Birmingham Council House and Clock 18 April 1986

As a photographer, one of the things that’s always irritated me about the WordPress.com blogging platform is the way it handles images. Post a photo on Flickr and then hotlink it into a WordPress.com post, and you’ll see a really nice, sharp image, that scales down with good definition as and when necessary. But upload a photo directly to WordPress and you’ll very often end up with quite an ill-defined result. It probably looks acceptable to the average visitor, but it doesn’t look spectacular, and when you spend time making sure your photos are perfect, that’s annoying. Continue reading How To Correct Unsharp Images on WordPress.com

Originals vs Copies – The “Salad Tastes Good” Joke

Original versus Copy

An eye-catching picture at the head of a blog post. It’s the done thing. But where do these pictures come from? Well, like pretty much everything else on the Internet, some are originals, created by the author or an accomplice, whilst others are simply copies of pre-existing online content. Sometimes the copies are re-posted with the creator’s permission, and sometimes they’re just stolen. This image is an original, taken by the author of the post, but would you have known or cared if it wasn’t? Continue reading Originals vs Copies – The “Salad Tastes Good” Joke

11 Twitter Mistakes That Will Immediately Get You Muted

Muting

In 2014, Twitter changed. Ever since, it’s been possible to do something which at face value sounds insane. It’s been possible to pretend to follow people on Twitter. It takes three clicks. Click Follow, click the User Actions cog, click Mute. Job done; you’re pretending to follow someone. Continue reading 11 Twitter Mistakes That Will Immediately Get You Muted

Top Ten Best Ever Free WordPress.com Themes

Sunspot

Although this is a list based on personal opinion rather than actual popularity stats, it doesn’t come without a lot of experimentation and use. With new themes arriving all the time, it’s getting harder and harder to unearth the real gems among the baffling range of options, and there are plenty of great current themes in this rundown. But the post shouldn’t be read purely as a “what to use” guide. It’s really a celebration of ten design icons from the full history of WordPress.com.

Three of the celebrated themes are no longer available for new blogs, but they were true greats in their day, and they add historical interest to an otherwise contemporary collection. The rest of the list comprises themes which any WP user can select straight from their Theme Options screen at the time of writing.

REDOABLE LITE

Redoable Lite Continue reading Top Ten Best Ever Free WordPress.com Themes