Tag Archives: scam

Will Twitter Ban “Cash Giveaway” Accounts?

If you haven’t yet seen one, where have you been? On Twitter, supposed “cash giveaways” have become a means for the self-styled “benefactor” to build a vast following, elicit unnaturally high levels of compliance from the public, and make a lot of money. But if there’s no separate terms and conditions page, the cash prize probably doesn’t exist. And even if it does, how would you know?…

If you just came to this post looking for clarification on which of these profiles are outright scams, try out the Twitter Scam Detector Tool. It’s a simple, one-click routine that will take you straight to any reports or discussions of suspicious activity for a user of your choice. There’s also some additional reading in the #TwitterPhilanthropy post, but don’t let any of this stop you reading on…

The “cash giveaway” scene is rapidly growing. It’s a world where the winners may never even be mentioned, let alone identified. Broadly, it’s just tweet after tweet of…

“RT, Like and Comment to win £5,000 in cash. Must be following me, and must tell me what a fantastic guy I am in the comment, blah, blah.”

That’s the kind of character we’re talking about. Not just spectacularly manipulative, but also childishly egotistical. And there’s no “Congratulations to the winner”. Aside from their occasional, staged convincer ruses, these dudes can’t even be bothered to pretend someone actually won. New day, new giveaway, and it never ends. Continue reading Will Twitter Ban “Cash Giveaway” Accounts?

The Twitter Suckers List

Car Wreckage Meme One Careful Owner

Suckers lists. Compilations of personal details relating to people who are easy to scam. You might think that this type of information is a very closed shop, with scam organisations keeping the data closely guarded among their ranks and charging a vast amount of money even to pass it on to fellow blag artists. But the combination of human ignorance and social media’s ‘sleepwalk’ privacy arrangements means that actually, if you want to compile your own suckers list, you can do it on Twitter, in moments, for free. Continue reading The Twitter Suckers List

The “I Make £437 Every Day” Advertorial Scam

The I Make 437 a Day Advertorial Scam

You’ve probably seen this ad around on the Internet. It’s been in circulation for a long time. If you’re anything like me you’ll have a policy of steering well clear when something you find online looks too good to be true. But these ads aren’t exactly an ‘underground’ phenomenon. They’re not restricted to aggressive ‘adult’ sites and the peer to peer networks. They appear on huge, supposedly reputable, mainstream sites, which have millions of users. That in itself lends them significant credibility. So where do the ads actually lead?…

Well, they lead to what’s known as an Advertorial site. In plain terms, a scam site.

The page is set up to look like an independent review, on a news site, which appears to have been endorsed by big and reputable news organisations. Here in the UK, that includes Sky News and the BBC. In America it includes CNN, NBC, ABC and FOX.

But the entire site is the work of a scam organisation. In fact, despite the way the site looks, it’s really just a single page. The links to other stories and sections don’t lead anywhere except to the con artist’s signup form, and the comments after the ‘article’ are all fake. It’s a con. Pure and simple. But the con artists are getting away with these ruses. Why? Because THEY ACTUALLY TELL YOU IT’S A CON. In very small print, at the bottom of the page, you’ll find the following information. I’ve used my own large, red, bold text to emphasise the important stuff. Needless to say the scam artists don’t do the same. This is the reality of “I make £437 every Day". Part 1…

Advertorial 1

And Part 2…

Advertorial 2

Or, in a sentence, it’s complete and utter bullshit. Not only that, but if you read the ‘advertorial’ you can see it’s clearly aimed at people who are in vulnerable situations. People who’ve lost their jobs and are in dire need of an income. Classic, morally bankrupt, scammers’ tactics. This setup seeks to con vulnerable people into throwing away what little means they do have on totally valueless offerings. Why are these cons allowed to persist? There has to be something wrong.