Tag Archives: privacy

“Private Search Engines” and Their Deals With Oppressive Trackers

Private Search Engines

The “privacy” model has become a default business strategy for new search engines. Why? Because it sells. Given the typically inferior quality of their results, and their often uninspiring user-experience, “private search engines” routinely over-achieve in terms of growth. So unless they have a revolutionary new concept, anyone entering today’s search market is almost compelled to trade on privacy.

They’re all at it. Barely a week goes by without a new “private search” brand coming up in the #privacy tags on Twitter. Some are just a front for affliate marketers to peddle overpriced rubbish. Others, such as Search Encrypt – taken seriously by a lot of people – are listed as malware. Some, despite billing themselves as privacy protectors on Twitter, have no SSL and literally no privacy policy whatsoever. “Private search” has become a joke. It’s that same old bunch of shady chancers using the gimmick of the moment in the hope of becoming billionaires. But what about the few brands that manage to attract continuous applause? Have we not noticed that they’re in bed with the enemy?… Continue reading “Private Search Engines” and Their Deals With Oppressive Trackers

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Why Deleting Your Social Media May Worsen Your Privacy

Delete Social Media

Deleting a social media account, or the content within it, has become a hot privacy topic in recent times. As more and more stories surface about the extent to which cyber giants collect and use our personal information, we’ve let the shock push us towards reflex action. How dare they quietly store private call logs and precise location info from our mobile phones, we think. How dare they record every move we make with a mouse, and tail us around the web logging our various site visits.

As we finally wake up to the reality that the whole internet is one big piece of spyware, the easiest solution is to blame Facebook, then promptly delete Facebook. Because that’s what certain influencers and high profile blogs are telling us to do. Continue reading Why Deleting Your Social Media May Worsen Your Privacy

How To Opt Out Of WordPress.com’s Internal Analytics Tracking

WordPress internal analytics opt-out

Don’t you just love the way GDPR has forced the data mining giants of cyberspace to begrudgingly provide us with more detailed privacy disclosures and a little “Get Lost Peeping Tom!” button? A handy means for us to reclaim at least some of our privacy and limit the amount of our personal data the companies can collect or preseve?

Of course, most businesses are only telling us as much as the law says they have to tell us, and plenty of information about newer tracking technologies is flying under the radar. But GDPR’s tighter data regulation is a step in the right direction, and the general fuss it’s created has prompted a lot of us to pay more attention to web tracking. We’re better understanding our rights as site users and visitors, as well as our responsibilities as site administrators. Continue reading How To Opt Out Of WordPress.com’s Internal Analytics Tracking

Has Scareware Gone Mainstream?

Mobile phone message prompt

If you’re an averagely engaged Internet user, the number of times you’ll have been asked for your phone number in the name of security has probably run beyond count. And yet some of the online providers who ask for this additional data, have been hacked. Continue reading Has Scareware Gone Mainstream?

Why You Can’t Anonymise Your Twitter Account

Yahoo Twitter 2008
The Internet never forgets. Yahoo’s Twitter page as it was in 2008, still live online today. Are your old, deleted pages preserved in the same place?

So your Twitter account has carried your name for a year, but now you want to be anonymous? No problem: all you do is change your screen name, and maybe also your username. Some of your followers will probably still know who you are, but no one else can find you, right? Continue reading Why You Can’t Anonymise Your Twitter Account

The Not-So-Advanced World of Online Troll Investigation

As a result of other posts on this blog, I’ve got used to being asked for help in unmasking “trolls”. Most typically, the requests have come from political activists who think they have the right to verbally attack those with whom they don’t agree, but should themselves be immune from any such attacks. Because… well, you know… Because their opinion is right, and everyone else’s is wrong, basically.

Continue reading The Not-So-Advanced World of Online Troll Investigation